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an exercise and you were dealing with a scenario, if you would have the dhs, you would have the fbi, you would have the nsa, the three key players where domestic incidents are concerned. so, as we move forward, and i hope this program continues just a suggestion for future years we have to do more. we have to do more. we have gone for about 5 miles an hour to 85 miles an hour at the dhs in the last three or so years. we need to be at 120 miles per hour. and i would say that across the federal government. so this is an issue that we are suddenly engaged in and the president is heavily engaged and he's demonstrated that by putting money into cyber at dhs. we have increased our work force about 600% over the last few years. he's consistently asked for double-digit increases in the cyber budget, and even this year we don't have a budget yet but if there were a budget, we would have a significant increase evin above fy 12 where we had a significant increase over fy 11. so the president is putting resources where the need is the greatest. we need to work with the private sector, and this is an inter
. >> next a look at the fbi and its role in investigating cyber related crimes. from this morning's "washington journal" this is about 45 minutes. >> this week's segment involving your money will look at the fbi's role in fighting cyber crimes. and we are talking about-based terrorism, espionage. computer intrusions, major cyber fraud. will learn a little bit, then we will get to your calls and will learn a little bit first from shawn henry, who was the fbi's executive director for criminal and cyber programs. and been in a peer for quite a number of years by thank you for joining us. >> thanks are having. spent first of all what exactly is a cybercrime? >> when you talk about cyber, i think danger to any type of criminal activity that involves the use of the computer i think that's what most people talk about. when i talk about cybercrime on focusing on intrusions into computer networks. so those networks that we all use every single day come to increase efficiency and effectiveness in and our productivity. but those very same things that make those networks were effective for us
of stuff, and the other is we reached out to all the regulators, fbi, pent began, ect., and we said we have flown to washington, constantly briefed by the fbi saying you have to be in the community, we'll open up to everything. you need to know what's possible. it's not my job to regulate. it's not my job to enforce. it's my job to help the regulars and enforcers do their job better. we feel our responsibility is to bring entities we trust in protecting our safety, bring them into the process and allow them to see what's possible, spot the bad guys early. by the way, we have a deal if you say something in the community, if you, like, so, here's the drone idea, and, you know, it's going a real long distance, you know, a payload that could be dangerous. dude, that's is sketchy. we'll call up the friends in the fbi just like that. we told everybody we're going to do it, and we feel that's our responsibility is to let the, you know, let the pros do their job. >> do you think it's time for laws of robotics? >> the three laws of robotics are the rules that stop robots from killing. everybody brin
at the fbi. we told them we would call the fbi. that is our responsibility. >> host: what about the three laws of robotics? >> but it turns out for the robot to be smart enough and they have already taken over the world. [laughter] it is very hard. cognition, artificial intelligence, shoot a gun and is easy. that is not the way it will have been. if you have the robots to make ethical choices, we just need to watch to evolves regulatory and surveillance abilities to spot it early. >> host: go back to synthetic biology with questions to worry about hobbyist doing a killer virus? the doctor email laing dm day. and a just and just this? >> i did talk at length about this. dna synthesis is done by big companies. you can design your own sequence said it to the lab then you get back in a vital but they are pretty good at spotting bad stuff. you don't know how they work but we trust them to protect us from that. but what of those are on every desktop? then they say we ensure there is intelligence that when you're sequence comes said, it needs to pass the test and only then. right now by the phot
of the fbi's cyber division. he held the highest ranking position in the fbi's cyber division, and he will be playing, um, the fbi director. so we have general cartwright playing the role of national security adviser, bill lynn is the secretary of defense -- um, this is perfect because it's halloween, so it's kind of even easier to play roles. [laughter] and we have steve to bin sky head of the fbi. and on your, on your screens you'll also see when your names come up, you'll see the roles that they're playing, and on your table we also have the agenda. and dmitri is the co-founder and chief technology officer for cloud strike, he's a computer security researcher, he helps focus business and governments on how to protect their intellectual property. and dmitri is going to play the role of the ceo of the oil company that gets hit in this exercise. dmitri is on the final end. and we have james lewis beside him, he's a senior fellow and program director for csis, he's worked at the state department and commerce, and he's a leading global expert on cyber. in 2010 he was with the united nat
to stop this from happening. and he entertained several ideas. the fbi is investigating the peabody also brings in a group of advisers who are not very widely known. they called the foreign intelligence advisory board. this is a group that does not have its own power. it's not like cia or defense intelligence agencies. all they do is advise the president. the president says it has complete control of her who was this board. now he has to screw to look into this and come up with recommendations. they came back and said what you need to do is get the cia to do this. the fbi can do the investigations, that they are particularly good as agents to enhance security at the beginning. they're not particularly in the backroom issues. so which you need to do is get the cia serious. but they recommended that the cia spy on american journalists, which is directly against the national security act that forms the cia. the cia is supposed to operate externally, not internally. kennedy authorizes this a program called project mockingbird. we still know very little about it because most of it is still cl
, the uniform crime numbers you're talking about, that's the numbers that the fbi uses to look at crimes so people report. there is a, the other, which i think you're familiar with, the other one that has to do with -- includes home invasion, kidnapping, and the other things that people included. the fbi is slowly shifting over the area. the state of texas got a federal grant years ago to do that shift except when i got my fbi briefing, texas is only at 12%. we can start doing that, you know, categorizing more numbers to get this for the people, people want, but, but, we got to remember we don't want to overload our law enforcement, fill out paperworks like we did with teachers some time ago. we want them on the street rather than filling out paperwork, but the state of texas, actually, is doing some of that. we just put money there in the state of texas, get all the figures that you want to. >> we spoke about this briefly, and i want to ask before i head to questions from the audience. two years from now, you may be campaigning for higher office -- >> [inaudible] >> when the website was la
. the fbi started investigating these, but he also brings in a group of advisers were not widely known. they are the intelligence advisory board. this is a group that does not have its own power. it's not like cia or defense intelligence agency. all they do is advise the president. the president has complete control over who is on this board. he asked this group to look and come up with a recommendation. they came back and said what you need to do is get the cia to do this. the fbi, they can do the slick investigations, but they are good at it because this background issues. what you need to do is get the ca to do this. so what they recommended is having cia spy and american generals. it forms the cia. the cia is supposed to protect journaling, not internally. kennedy authorizes the program ends up being called project mockingbird. we still know very little about it because most of the still classified, but it was one of the items that the national security archives in 2006 and 2007. so the program in the summer of 1962 was when kennedy is starting to crack down drastically on leaks. d
recollection. i just don't have a recollection of this. it's fascinating, and ex-fbi agent named james brosnahan, who actually spoke to for this the. i called him a. he was a great witness for the opposition because he had been the fbi agent that had been called to the scene in phoenix in 1960s in the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. he was a very well-known and respected respected lawyer by 10 in san francisco. brosnahan said of his day. i was the fbi agent on the scene. identify him as the man. it was discouraging but voters. rehnquist was giving them a test, which was not illegal, but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said that was not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. so james brosnahan comes and puts a lot on the line. >> guest: and really kind of just gets hammered because he's not let that anything that he can grab onto to come back. he just says they can't explain it. it's just not me. i was very, i thought kg. very typical when i met with rehnquist 10
dangerous, we are like that sounds totally sketchy and we will call off our friend the fbi just like that and we told everybody we would do it and we feel that is our responsibility to let the pros to their job. >> is it time -- [talking over each other] >> robotics, rules would stop robots. it makes everyone bring this up, turns out for a robot to be smart enough to apply the three loss, already taken over the world. that is artificial intelligence, cognition and this stuff. just shooting guns is easy. robots are good at bad stuff which is really reassuring to people. that is not the way it is going to happen. we can't, and you our robots with intelligence to make ethical choices. we need to change society and culture to watch what is going on. you all are regulatory and surveillance -- we can spot it early. >> back to synthetic biology. questions about are we going to worry about hobbyists doing a killer virus, we need to worry about the dr. e-mailing you dna for your vaccine, we don't know how easy e-mail is doing just to your kids. >> i talked about this. right now dna synthesis
outside the justice department. outside the fbi, the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that then was not a threat to national security. had we made the determination that a threat to national security existed, we would, of course, have made that known to the president and also to the appropriate members on the hill. as we went through the investigation, looked at the facts, and tried to exam them as they develop. we were very -- we felt very secure in the knowledge that a national security threat did not exist that warranted the sharing of that information with the white house or with the -- when we got a point in the investigation, it was very late in the investigation after a critical interview occurred on the friday before we made that disclosure. when we got to that point, when we thought it was appropriate to share the information, we did so. >> thank you. >>> friday on washington journal, republican wisconsin senator ron johnson on the fiscal cliff negotiation and what's ahead for the congress. more on the fisc
to the normal criminal element. and the third is what f.b.i. director robert mueller said, there is a very real possibility trainees will recruit more terrorists from among the federal inmate population and continue al qaeda operations from the inside, which is how the new york synagogue bombers were recruited. all of these things are -- we shouldn't even be debating this. the ayotte amendment is one that would take care of this. we don't have to worry about it from year to year. we don't have to anguish over this thing that we've decided several times. i can remember, i guess it was back in the early administration of obama, when he identified 17 areas in the united states that would be appropriate for incarcerating terrorists, that we would take out of gitmo. and one of those places happened to be fort sill in my state of oklahoma. i went down to fort sill. i looked at the facility that we had that was housed within fort sill facility. and there was a lady there whose name was sergeant major carter. i can remember when she came up to me, she said, senator, why in the world -- go back and tell
. well, i don't mind the police or the fbi. well, the department of agriculture has a s.w.a.t. team. the fish and wildlife says what seemed. the fish and wildlife rated gibson guitar with guns drawn , to call their computer equipment and would and then did not let them know what they were accused of for years. when they finally accused of something it was breaking of foreign regulation, a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized and the u.s. for breaking a law in india does the kind of stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them you have. one of them is the case of a couple selling bunnies in a little town in missouri. there were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, you can pay on our website, $90,000. if you don't take in 30 days 00s over $3 million. this is the kind of stuff that your government is doing to bully people demand we, frankly, think it needs to stop. they did the same with compass getting people's land insane, you can build on it because it's a wet land even though there is no
on the specifics of the investigation. the fbi has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. and i'm going to let director mueller and others examine those protocols, and make some statements to the public generally. i do want to emphasize what i said before. general petraeus had an extraordinary career. deserved this country with great distinction in iraq, in afghanistan, and as head of the cia. by his own assessment, he did not meet the standards that he felt were necessary as the director of cia with respect to this personal matter that he is now dealing with, with his family, and with his wife. and it's on that basis that he tendered his resignation, and it's on that basis that i accepted it. but i want to emphasize that from my perspective at least, he has provided this country and extraordinary service. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this instead of being -- this into a being a single side note on what has been otherwise been an extraordinary career. [inaudible] >> you kn
in education and job-training and health and housing and the fbi coming air-traffic control, food safety, an entire range of domestic programs. for education that can't be what you count head start for the department of health and human services. it's to be about a $4.8 billion cut, the largest education cut ever in history of the country that would move us further essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gap, increasing high school graduation rates, increasing kawlija access and college completion so our biggest challenge in the short term is to work together with groups like the urban league and the national council of la raza and others to come up with a balanced approach on the deficit reduction and as janet said, ask people who can afford to pay a lot more to do so without balancing the budget on the backs of children and students and working people and low-income people. there's a couple quick things i want to say that we are also facing increasing enrollment expected to go up in the next decade with the elementary and secondary level even faster tha
. the trustees began by asking former fbi director free to lead an independent investigation which yielded 119 recommendations on how to enhance our internal policies and practices. we've already implemented more than one-third of the recommendations, and many more are nearing completion. we remain p committed to the process because we believe it made us a better, stronger university. we're committed to the fight against child abuse. central to this effort is the newly established center for the protection of children based at the penn state hershey hospital and ongoing partnership with the pennsylvania coalition against rape. earlier this week, we completed the first penn state national conference on child sexual abuse. this forum, brought together leaders, experts from law enforcement, pediatric medicine, prevention research, and education. we formed the penn state network for child protection a and well being comprised of 35 faculty members with interdisciplinary expertise with the aim to accelerate the pace of discovery by linking research and practice and build the network with additional
states and defeated an incumbent president by a larger margin than fbi and -- at tiahrt and herbert hoover. he did among the various subgroups the women, african-americans, asians, hispanics, 18 to 29 and so forth and you overly his performance in 1980 over this electorate, he loses by the same amount that rahm needed -- romney did. this is a long-term problem for the party. the country is becoming more diverse. of the country's aging, and this is going to present some challenges for the party. i am relatively optimistic that they can find ways to build bridges to those voters that they need to get about it now. >> ralph you talk about demographics and we have other panelists we have ever heard from yet but since you were leaving early i want to ask you haven't mentioned the issue free of the conversation and the christian conservative community. it does seem to me to have a role. can you talk about foreign policy or the individuals and how the christian community is now with the conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> we are still looking at a post-election
more problematic. i think one of the other panelists mentioned this quote from fbi director, and you see the same concerns of talking about in the commercial sphere, to. he said basically set to every company is being hacked one way or another and it's not a question of when they will be hacked. it will be a question of when it will happen again. that might be a pessimistic view of how bitter cybersecurity sector can be. it is certainly a theme you see in the space. my only point, the only other point i want to make on commercial data is that you see and report. there was a report issued by verizon about data breach investigation, that suggests that a lease in endears large numbers of serious cyber intrusions intrusions have been aimed at create taking authentication credential, passwords, usernames, things like that. things that can be used for later inclusion's in the future, things that might give an intruder broader access to a network. so i'd like to shift for a moment, those ideas in mind, and talk about offense of cyber operations. and what do we mean by that and what is, what
coastal town in california. he was the subject, on the fbi most wanted list and responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pak
't have the fbi interviews of the survivors one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said tonight at the attack has been shared with congress says that this day. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends thought like john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision qualification. john bolton the ambassador and democrats talk in their fields saying we're not going to vote, not going to consider this nomination until they get basic answers to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to hold that post. she's a former national security advisor under president george w. bush. she is also the cofounder of the center for a new generation, which is an innovative afterschool enrichment program, and sh
qaeda? is that right? so if our military is authorized to use force, they don't have to call the f.b.i. or the virginia state police to shoot. they can shoot themselves against an enemy coming at them in america. mr. levin: coming here and attacking us, a navy base or at a -- mr. graham: sliewlg. right. because we're not fighting a crime. we don't have to disarm our military and call the local cops, "would you please shoot these people they get here." no, we're going to shoot you. if you get in a boat asked to attack a military ship or boat in the united states, we're going to shoot you. and if we wound you, we're going to capture you. and then here's what we're going to do to you, incident of using force. the supreme court has said that when you authorize to use force, it makes no sense to give that authorization if you don't have the power to detain. because the worst thing you could do to the american military is to make them to kill everybody and capture no one. or let the other -- or let them go. so kill them all is not good policy and it's a bad spot to put your military in, and
was crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were wearing tweed jackets. a terrible thing to wear in santa fe. some real serious espionage went on. that is great drama. i went to santa fe to walk around the streets that characters walk around. i find that very hopeful. >> i wondered when i came to buffalo with a you had gone to buffalo. >> oh yes. a couple times i have been to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features heavily in the first book, and 1 hundred years ago was a very different place from what it is like today. nevertheless i went and looked around but i got ahold of old maps, the buffalo blue book which was the list of high society people in town, got newspapers that were published in newspapers published at the time and walking around is never enough, but it is a good basis. >> gives you a feel for the place. in doing research, it is one thing if you do your research but are you able to do your own research in a book like this that covers so much? >> i have to do it. other people wouldn't know what i was looking for. i do have helped in finding stuff. i use a resea
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
agencies who carry firearms in the government. i don't mind the police or the fbi, well, the department of agricultural has a swat team. the fish and wildlife have a swat team. they raided gibson guitar with guns drawn, took their computer equipment. when they accused them of something which was breaking a foreign regulation. a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in the india. those are the kind of stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them you have heard. one the case of john and judy. they were selling bun anies in missouri. they fined $95,000 for having a wrong permit. the government said you can pay on the website. if you don't pay in thirty days you'll owe $3.1 billion. it's the kind of stuff the government is doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confiscating people's land and saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland. even though there isn't a pond or stream on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >>
the fbi that is the national organization that has the resources to do the things that local jurisdictions, whether state or local don't have the resources to do. i believe that it's possible to have speed you can see this "washington journal" segment at our website, c-span.org. live now to the senate floor on foreign relations for remarks from the recommendations commission chair julius genachowski. is expected to discuss international telecommunications policy. this is just getting underway. >> very excited to be here today. is perhaps the most anticipated cfr event and much as the new james bond movie. i'm glad that chairman could join us today. just a quick introduction, prior to his fcc opponent, chairman genachowski was chief of business operations before that general counsel at iac interactive corp., special advisor and cofounder of the technology incubator lunchbox digital. his full bio is in your packages. i will turn over to the chairman for some quick opening remarks. we'll been going to the conversation where i follow up with some questions, and then after that we will open up
jefferson serving a 13 year term in federal prison. he was convicted in 2009 after fbi agents investigating obligation from corruption found $90,000 in cash hidden in jefferson's freezer. a federal appeals court upheld all but one of the 11 accounts on which the jury convicted jefferson. congress is back this week following last week's thanksgiving break you listen to me your bloomberg who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced and was 10 feet, governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable when we had five years, hurricane wind, we had, you know, massive flooding and you look at the city's shut down of the stock exchanges we start to get a sense of the scale and scope and yet the networks perform. i've read dozens of stories the last couple of weeks have many consumers there are only a link to information, the only tied to any sort of affirmation or people with through their smartphone, so while there was obviously an impact on the sites the networks performed really pretty well. >> some networks did well, some did less we
don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said the night of the attack, as of this date. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like a john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision about ambassador bolton's qualifications. john bolton, the then ambassador, and democratic saying we're not going to go, we're not going to consider this domination domination in till we get basic answers to our concern. all i can do is that the concerns i have are greater today than they were before, and we're not even close to getting the basic answers. [inaudible] >> i have many more questions that need to be answered. [inaudible] >> ambassador rice released a statement about that meeting with senators mccain, graham and kelly ayotte saying in part in the course of the meeting we explained that the talking points provided by the intelligence community and the initial assessment upon which they were based were incorrect in the key respect. there
to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to the american people what was going on in the bailouts. to help guide treasury who is in charge of implementing the program to make sure the policy goals would be implemented. as mike is telling me about this, i had no idea why he was telling me until he said he was going to recommend me to the white house for this job. i was not interested in going to washington, i really had no interest in going back, and i started picking through the reasons to mike, getting rare my -- married in january, just started the mortgage fraud group, a big trial working years on to try coming up, and mike knocked my objections d
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